17 comments

  1. So sad – but by this point the woman has point so many years of her life into being a ballerina. Where does she draw the line when dancing is her identity – knowing she will probably not be able to even walk when she gets old. Will it have been worth it?

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    1. I know but as musicians, writers, we break, too. I once wrote 22 sonnets and when I got to number 11 just couldn’t go on and actually cried. I’m so bad at writing music because I only know chords and I get so upset that I get migraines. Yet I was finally able to write the sonnet and (ha, ha) “compose” the song and felt so wonderful. You probably have your own trials with real composing of music and writing your blogs. Maybe our injuries aren’t as obvious as a ballet dancer but I admit, if I had the talent, I would be a ballet dancer, broken toes and all 🙂

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    1. Oh, it is. If you look in Google images you will be amazed at the foot damage. This image was mild. I feel guilty always whining about my fingers being torn and bloody from playing ukulele! 😀

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  2. I read this in my email without the picture. I imagined it from the words alone, having seen similar in the past. The Haiku truly captures the essence of the ballerina’s devotion to the art.

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    1. Thanks so much, Pablo! I also posted this in my Goodreads blog, without the image, and worried that readers wouldn’t understand, so I appreciate your comment!

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  3. splendid capture of the notion (fact?) that if there is sacrifice, no ordeal that will leave a mark (those that can be seen and those not seen) then it probably isn’t love. I mentioned on another blog’s post about the frustrating chase after an inspiration asking to grasped: blood, sweat and tears.

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